Showing

Whilst Xtra Dog is not a supplier of Show Dog equipment and will never pretent to be one, we do stock a number of products that are very popular with people buynowwho show their dogs both at Championship level and at fun level. These include Spiffy Dog collars. Being made of soft lightweight Aerospacer material they, together with the Adanac fleece collars, cause no fur damage to the dogs so are ideal as everyday or house colars. Our fleece-lined harnesses are also very popular for the same reason; they don't cause fur damage, and being front ringed they are ideal for teaching dogs to walk without pulling - very important for showing dogs in the ring. Many dogs get very worried at shows and the Calming Coats and the TTouch wraps are very useful tools to help dogs to relax on their benches before going into the ring. At hot outdoor shows, the Techniche Cooling Coats can keep your dog nice and cool without wetting his or her fur, keeping her relaxed when entering the ring. Many people who show dogs own multiple dogs and our walking belts can make dog walks much easier. Finally do check out our soft crates. They will fit into your bench at a show and give your dog some time out in their own special, relaxed place they can call their own.

Conformation shows, also referred to as breed shows, are a kind of dog show in which a judge familiar with a specific dog breed evaluates individual purebred dogs for how well the dogs conform to the established breed type for their breed, as described in a breed's individual breed standard.

A conformation dog show is not a comparison of one dog to another but a comparison of each dog to a judge's mental image of the ideal breed type as outlined in the individual breed's breed standard. Dog show judges attempt to identify dogs who epitomise the published standards for each breed. This can be challenging, because some judgements must necessarily be subjective. As an example, what exactly entails a "full coat" or a "cheerful attitude", descriptions found in breed standards, can only be learned through experience with the breed that has that particular requirement.

Judges are generally certified to judge one or several breeds, usually in the same group, but a few "all-breed" judges have the training and experience to judge large numbers of breeds.

The first modern conformation dog show was held in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England in June 1859, and the only breeds scheduled were pointers and setters.

Winning dogs are awarded prizes by the judge.

Dogs compete at dog shows to earn points or certification towards championship titles.
The Kennel Club (UK) system, which is also used by the Australian National Kennel Council and in other countries, is considered the most difficult to earn a title under. At certain shows designated as Championship shows, the top bitch and dog in each breed will be awarded a Challenge Certificate (CC), with three CCs needed to become a champion. The number of CCs on offer for each breed is decided by the Kennel Club in advance, so opportunities to gain a title are very limited.

In the US and Canada, each time a dog wins at some level of a show, it earns points towards the championship. The number of points varies depending on what level within a show the win occurs, how many dogs are competing, and whether the show is a major (larger shows) or minor (smaller shows). The exact number of points needed to gain a championship varies depending on the kennel club offering the title.

Fédération Cynologique Internationale sponsors international shows that differ from other shows in that dogs first receive individual written descriptions of positive and negative qualities from the judge, and only dogs with high ratings go on to compete against other dogs in the class. A dog must receive four international Certificat d'Aptitude au Championnat International de Beauté to qualify for a Championship; one must be won in the dog's own country, and at least two in other countries under at least three different judges.

Dogs compete in a hierarchical fashion at each show, where winners at lower levels are gradually combined to narrow the winners until the final round, where Best in Show is chosen, usually from among specials, dogs that have already completed their championships and are competing for group and best in show wins. At the lowest level, dogs are divided by breed. Each breed is divided into classes based on sex and, sometimes, age. Males (dogs) are judged first, then females (bitches). At the next level they are divided by group. At the final level, all dogs compete together under a specially trained all-breed judge.

Dog shows in the UK

There are several types of show in the UK. The smallest are the Companion Shows, where there are usually a few conformation classes for pedigree dogs, and several "novelty" classes, such as waggliest tail and handsomest dog, which are open to any dog including crossbreeds. These shows are usually held to support a charity or other good cause.

Then there are Open shows, which are open only to dogs registered with the Kennel Club. There are many Open Shows that are held all around the country. Here the dog and handler can gain experience and the dog can gain points towards a Junior Warrant award or a Show Certificate of Merit.

There are also Limited shows, which are open only to members of the Society or Club running the show, and Challenge Certificate winners (see below) cannot enter.
Finally, there are the huge Championship shows, where dogs can gain points towards a Junior Warrant and compete for the highly coveted Challenge Certificate (CC). If the breed is sufficiently numerous, the Kennel Club awards a Challenge Certificate for the Best Dog and Best Bitch. A dog needs three CCs from three different judges to be awarded the title of Champion one of which must be awarded when the dog is over 12 month old. The most prestigious Championship show is Crufts, and each dog entered at Crufts has had to qualify by certain wins at Championship show level.

The Kennel Club also operates a separate show open only to mixed-breeds, Scruffts, which judges its contestants on character, health and temperament with people and other dogs.

Dog shows in the US

There are seven classes per breed in American Kennel Club dog shows: Puppy (sometimes divided between 6-9 months and 9-12 months), 12-18 months, Novice (6 months and older, and having won no previous championship points), Amateur Owner Handler (where the owner is exhibiting the dog and has not received funds for showing any other dog), Bred By Exhibitor (where the person handling the dog is an owner and breeder of record), American-Bred, and Open. The American-Bred and Open classes are mandatory for each show, while the others are optional. In some cases one or more of these classes may be divided by color, height, weight, or coat type.

First to fourth place are awarded in each class. The winners of all classes in each sex compete for Winners (best) Dog and Winners Bitch. These wins are awarded points toward a Championship, based on the number of dogs in each sex competing in the classes. The remaining class winners are joined by the runner-up from the class from which the Winner was selected and there are competitions for second place in each sex, called Reserve Winners Dog and Reserve Winners Bitch. If for any reason the Winner is determined to be ineligible for the points on that day, they would instead be awarded to the Reserve Winner (a bit like the First Runner-Up in the Miss America pageant).

Once the Winners and Reserves are chosen, the Best of Breed competition begins. This group consists of any dog or bitch that has finished its Championship, plus the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch. The dog or bitch that the judge feels best represents the breed standard on that day is awarded Best of Breed; the best animal of the opposite gender is awarded Best of Opposite Sex; and the better of the Winners Dog or Winners Bitch is awarded Best of Winners. (The Winners Dog or Bitch can be awarded Best of Breed or Best of Opposite Sex, as well.) In a Specialty show, the Best of Breed is also called Best in Specialty.

In multi-breed and all-breed shows, the winners of all breeds within the kennel club's breed Groups then compete for Group placements. So, for example, all the Terrier Group Best of Breed winners compete for Group First, Group Second, Group Third, and Group Fourth. Finally, the seven Group First winners compete for Best in Show. Beginning July 3, 2012, the final judge at all AKC all-breed shows will also award a "Reserve Best in Show."
In the American Kennel Club, a dog needs 15 points to become a Champion, with each win gaining anywhere from zero to five points depending on the number of dogs competing and the area where the show is held. At least two wins must be a set of three or more points ("majors"), under two different judges; at least one additional win under a third judge is also required. Additional points may be awarded to the Best of Winners, or a class dog that goes Best of Breed or Best of Opposite Sex, again depending on the number of dogs competing.

The rules for the United Kennel Club (UKC) use a different system. A championship requires a combination of points and competition wins. Points are awarded at breed level for each win; for example, winning the class earns 10 points in non-variety breeds, 5 in variety breeds, even if there are no other dogs to beat in the class. Competition Wins are wins over at least one other dog, whether in their own breed (such as going Best Fe/male or Best of Winners) or higher level (placing above at least one other dog in the group or Best/Reserve Best in Multi-Breed show). A championship requires a total of 100 points and three competition wins.

Prestigious dog shows

Dog shows take place all year in various locations. Some are small, local shows, while others draw competitors from all around the country or the world. Some shows are so large that they limit entries only to dogs who have already earned their Championships. Therefore, winning Best in Breed or Best in Show can elevate a dog's, a breeder's, or a kennel's reputation to the top of the list overnight. This greatly increases the price of puppies bred from this dog or at the dog's kennel of origin. On the down side, these prestigious wins can sometimes also increase the popularity of a breed, as many people decide they want a dog "just like that cute one I saw winning on TV".

Crufts

In the United Kingdom, the international championship show Crufts was first held in 1891. Since its centenary year in 1991, the show has officially been recognised as the world's largest and most prestigious dog show by the Guinness Book of Records, with a total of 22,973 dogs being exhibited that year. 22,964 dogs were exhibited in 2008, 27 short of the previous record. Crufts is held over four days at the National Exhibition Centre (NEC) in Birmingham and it is the largest annual event held at the venue, with an estimated 160,000 human visitors in 2008. The winner of the title of "Best In Show" receives a replica of the solid silver Keddall Memorial Trophy and a surprisingly small cash prize of £100.

American Dog Shows

The largest and most prestigious dog show in America is the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, was established in 1877 and is held annually at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The 2008 show had a total entry of 2,627 dogs making the event the second largest continuously held sporting event in America.

The other two major American dog shows are the National Dog Show (which is televised on Thanksgiving Day by NBC, usually after the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade) and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship.

World Dog Show

The World Dog Show is sponsored by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale for international championships in conformation and other dog sports. The location rotates between member countries.[9] The 2008 show was held in Stockholm, Sweden, the 2009 in Bratislava, Slovakia and the 2010 show in Herning, Denmark.

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